Archive for the ‘Sugar’ Category

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Limit Carbs to Lose Weight and Extend Lifespan

December 20, 2010

(Article first published as Cut Carbs, Not Fat to Lose Weight and Live Longer on Technorati.)

Carbs Promote Body Fat and Lead to Disease

Carbs Promote Body Fat and Lead to Disease

We’re having trouble changing our mindset about the best type of diet to promote health and weight loss. For decades we have been told that fat is bad and whole grain carbohydrates are good. Food manufacturers cleverly cut all the fat from many of their offerings and pumped up sugar and carbs to compensate. We merrily went along eating massive quantities of `healthy` low fat foods with the thought that we would avoid fat, get skinny and avoid the number one killer, heart disease.

Unfortunately just the opposite has happened. American obesity rates are at epidemic proportions and heart disease still unnecessarily claims the lives of millions each year. Fortunately it’s not too late to make changes that can save your life and help you to lose weight permanently.

Fat is Not the Problem

Healthy Fat Sources Promote Good Health

Healthy Fat Sources Promote Good Health

Current dietary advice from the USDA food pyramid promotes the idea that the bulk of our daily calories should come from carbohydrates. Fat is to be used sparingly and there is no differentiation between different fat sources. Information provided by medical researchers and published in the Los Angeles Times explains that we have been misled over the years and that fat is actually a vital component to cellular structure. Carbohydrates and sugars are the real culprit that influence how body fat is stored and can wreak havoc with normal metabolic activity.

Dr. Walter Willett, chairman of the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health explains “If Americans could eliminate sugary beverages, potatoes, white bread, pasta, white rice and sugary snacks, we would wipe out almost all the problems we have with weight and diabetes and other metabolic diseases.” Refined and processed carbs have become the core of our diet. Eventually, carb overload leads to insulin resistance, diabetes and heart disease and has a major impact on our ability to lose weight.

Carb Warfare: The Battle of the Bulge

Over time, our body becomes tired from processing large amounts of carbohydrates. The pancreas exhausts its natural ability to secrete insulin and counter the massive amount of sugar that is continually dumped into the bloodstream. The body preferentially burns carbohydrates for energy, and stores the remaining calories as fat. When given the opportunity, our body prefers to burn fat, but there must be an absence of carbs for this to happen.

The typical American diet provides a never ending flow of carbs and corresponding blood sugar spikes. We like to snack regularly between meals, so there is rarely an absence of carbohydrates. Our body is never able to tap into our fat stores because we continually provide a ready source of energy in the form of high carb consumption. The only way to trigger fat metabolism is to drastically limit our carb intake.

Cut the Carbs for Weight Loss Success and Health

Restrict Carbs to Lower Blood Sugar and Improve Insulin Response

Restrict Carbs to Lower Blood Sugar and Improve Insulin Response

Humans have not evolved with the ability to consume and metabolize huge quantities of carbohydrates. The typical American diet is 60% carbohydrate and the direct cause of the obesity calamity, as well as a significant trigger for many inflammatory diseases. Drop carb intake to no more than 20% of calories and substitute healthy monounsaturated uncooked fats and protein sources with each meal. Fats and proteins are more difficult for the body to break down and slow the release of glucose from carbohydrates. Try drastically lowering your carb intake for 2 weeks and you’ll be on the road to successful weight loss and improved health.

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Drinking Sweetened Beverages Boosts Risk of Diabetes 26%

November 1, 2010

(Article first published as Soda and Sweetened Drinks Increase Risk of Diabetes on Technorati.)

Sweetened Drinks Increase Risk of Developing Diabetes

Sweetened Drinks Increase Risk of Developing Diabetes

The incidence of Type II diabetes has been steadily increasing over the past half century. Projections are that the number of new cases will triple by 2050, afflicting 1 in 3 men, women and children. Many people are unaware they have the disease as there are no outward symptoms in the early stages of the disease.

Few realize that having diabetes increases the risk of developing heart disease and sudden death from a heart attack twofold. Research has now linked liquid sugar in the form of soda and sweetened beverages directly to the skyrocketing incidence of new cases of the deadly disease. Taking the proper steps today can dramatically lower your risk of becoming diabetic and allow you to avoid the many dangerous complications.

Study Confirms Link Between Soda and Risk of Diabetes

The typical 12 ounce serving of most sweetened soft drinks is equivalent to eating 12 teaspoons of sugar. Few people would ever use that much if they were to sweeten a beverage themselves, yet they subject themselves to several servings every day. The results of a study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health and published in the journal Diabetes Care demonstrates that soda and other sweetened beverages are ‘clearly and consistently associated with greater risk of metabolic syndrome and Type II diabetes’. Two sugary drinks per day increase risk of diabetes by 26% and metabolic syndrome by 20%.

Sugar in Soda Linked to Weight Gain

Excess Sugar From Soda Leads to Weight Gain

Excess Sugar From Soda Leads to Weight Gain

Empty sugar calories in sweetened beverages are linked to weight gain and play a significant role in the rapid rise in obesity. The key sweetener in most soda is high fructose corn syrup that is known to promote obesity because of the way it’s metabolized by the liver.

Calories from this source aren’t registered as a source of energy since they bypass processing in the liver and are passed straight through to the blood where they cause blood sugar levels to spike. The excess sugar is converted to triglycerides and neatly packed away as body fat. Eventually this process causes metabolic instability, high blood pressure, insulin resistance and diabetes.

Break the Sugar Cycle with Natural Diet and Fresh Brewed Tea

Fresh Brewed Tea is a Great Alternative to Soda

Fresh Brewed Tea is a Great Alternative to Soda

The best news from this study is that you can have a significant impact on your risk of developing diabetes by making small changes to your diet and lifestyle. The first step is to cut all sweetened beverages. This will lower your daily calories significantly and begin the slow process of metabolic recovery as your body works to regain control over blood sugar levels and improve insulin response. Include at least 4 cups of fresh brewed tea each day and sweeten with all natural stevia extract as needed.

A natural compliment to removing sugary drinks from your diet is to lower your total glycemic load by slowly cutting processed foods that contain high fructose corn syrup or excessive amounts of sugar. Remember that refined carbohydrates such as breads, pasta, rice and potatoes have the same effect as eating sugar because they are rapidly converted to glucose through digestion. Replace these foods with healthy alternatives including fresh raw vegetables, nuts, seeds, and minimally cooked meats. These foods break down slowly and don’t cause wild blood sugar surges that lead to diabetes.

Everyone needs to be aware of the need to cut sugar from their diet. Soda has been identified as a prime food source that contributes to diabetes, and health conscious individuals will remove all sources of sugar from their diet to dramatically lower the risk of diabetes and extend their natural lifespan.

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Top Diabetes Prevention Strategy

October 24, 2010

(Article first published as New Diabetes Cases Projected to Triple by 2050 on Technorati.)

Diabetes is Preventable with Dietary Modification

Diabetes is Preventable with Dietary Modification

Information released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that diabetes will continue to grow to epidemic proportions over the next 40 years. Presently 1 in 10 US adults suffers from the disease, yet a quarter of those people are unaware their metabolism is no longer able to counteract the damaging effects of all the processed foods and sugar they consume each day. The disease is caused by poor diet and lifestyle and is considered to be one of the ten most preventable diseases.

Disabling the Health Care System

People diagnosed with diabetes have medical costs that are more than twice that of those who don’t have the disease. According to a study published in the journal Population Health Metrics, the number of diabetes cases will triple by 2050, affecting between 1 in 3 and 1 in 5 depending on population statistics and how long people will live after developing the disease. Diabetes will become the leading underlying cause of mortality as it more than doubles the risk of heart disease and sudden death from a heart attack.

The Real Cause of Type II Diabetes

With small exception, Type II diabetes is caused by a diet that is packed with processed foods stripped of any nutrients and loaded with sugar and refined carbohydrates. This diet accounts for the majority of calories consumed by many people each day. With every meal, blood sugar levels are pushed higher, followed by a severe crash.

These wild swings eventually overpower insulin’s ability to mop up excess sugar in the blood and usher it to muscles and our cells to be used as a source of energy. Ultimately insulin becomes resistant to the increased blood sugar levels and is unable to efficiently remove excess glucose from our blood. Sugar is then allowed to remain in the blood where it damages organs and causes serious complications to our kidneys, heart, eyes and nervous system.

Prevent Diabetes in Your Future with Diet

Low Carb Diet is Essential to Control Diabetes

Low Carb Diet is Essential to Control Diabetes

Research has shown that you can effectively prevent and treat diabetes through a stringent plan involving dietary modification and blood sugar monitoring. Any food that dramatically raises blood sugar must be systematically eliminated from your diet. Begin by cutting all processed carbohydrates such as chips, crackers and all junk food treats. The vast majority of people are also very sensitive to wheat and cornstarch so they must eliminate all breads (including multi-grain varieties), pasta and potato-based foods.

Check Your Blood Sugar After Eating

Monitor Blood Sugar After Each Meal

Monitor Blood Sugar After Each Meal

The second part of the plan involves checking blood sugar after eating, as this is when glucose becomes elevated and is known to be most dangerous. Begin by reading all nutrition labels for carbohydrate content. Any food that lists more than 5 grams per serving should be avoided. Using an inexpensive blood glucose meter, check your blood sugar at 1 and 2 hour intervals to be sure you don’t exceed 140 mg/Dl at any time. Extensive research has shown that blood glucose levels above 140 mg/Dl result in diabetic complications and are a strong indicator that you are either diabetic or will become diabetic within the next 6 to 12 months.

The important news is that you can either prevent or treat diabetes before it has a chance to deteriorate your health. By controlling blood sugar with a healthy low carbohydrate diet and strict monitoring of blood glucose levels, you can halt this disease in its tracks and dramatically lower the risk of many deadly complications.

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Protect Yourself From Diabetes

October 24, 2010

(Article first published as New Diabetes Cases Projected to Triple by 2050 on Technorati.)

Information released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that diabetes will continue to grow to epidemic proportions over the next 40 years. Presently 1 in 10 US adults suffers from the disease, yet a quarter of those people are unaware their metabolism is no longer able to counteract the damaging effects of all the processed foods and sugar they consume each day. The disease is caused by poor diet and lifestyle and is considered to be one of the ten most preventable diseases.

Disabling the Health Care System
People diagnosed with diabetes have medical costs that are more than twice that of those who don’t have the disease. According to a study published in the journal Population Health Metrics, the number of diabetes cases will triple by 2050, affecting between 1 in 3 and 1 in 5 depending on population statistics and how long people will live after developing the disease. Diabetes will become the leading underlying cause of mortality as it more than doubles the risk of heart disease and sudden death from a heart attack.
The Real Cause of Type II Diabetes
With small exception, Type II diabetes is caused by a diet that is packed with processed foods stripped of any nutrients and loaded with sugar and refined carbohydrates. This diet accounts for the majority of calories consumed by many people each day. With every meal, blood sugar levels are pushed higher, followed by a severe crash.
These wild swings eventually overpower insulin’s ability to mop up excess sugar in the blood and usher it to muscles and our cells to be used as a source of energy. Ultimately insulin becomes resistant to the increased blood sugar levels and is unable to efficiently remove excess glucose from our blood. Sugar is then allowed to remain in the blood where it damages organs and causes serious complications to our kidneys, heart, eyes and nervous system.
Prevent Diabetes in Your Future with Diet

Research has shown that you can effectively prevent and treat diabetes through a stringent plan involving dietary modification and blood sugar monitoring. Any food that dramatically raises blood sugar must be systematically eliminated from your diet. Begin by cutting all processed carbohydrates such as chips, crackers and all junk food treats. The vast majority of people are also very sensitive to wheat and cornstarch so they must eliminate all breads (including multi-grain varieties), pasta and potato-based foods.

Check Your Blood Sugar After Eating

The second part of the plan involves checking blood sugar after eating, as this is when glucose becomes elevated and is known to be most dangerous. Begin by reading all nutrition labels for carbohydrate content. Any food that lists more than 5 grams per serving should be avoided. Using an inexpensive blood glucose meter, check your blood sugar at 1 and 2 hour intervals to be sure you don’t exceed 140 mg/Dl at any time. Extensive research has shown that blood glucose levels above 140 mg/Dl result in diabetic complications and are a strong indicator that you are either diabetic or will become diabetic within the next 6 to 12 months.

The important news is that you can either prevent or treat diabetes before it has a chance to deteriorate your health. By controlling blood sugar with a healthy low carbohydrate diet and strict monitoring of blood glucose levels, you can halt this disease in its tracks and dramatically lower the risk of many deadly complications.
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B Vitamins Help Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

October 20, 2010

(Article first published as Can B Vitamins Help to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease? on Technorati.)

Alzheimer's Disease is Increasing at an Alarming Rate

Alzheimer's Disease is Increasing at an Alarming Rate

Alzheimer’s disease robs a person of their memories, thoughts and individuality. When surveyed, people indicate that of all diseases, this form of dementia is the most dreaded and misunderstood. Medical science can offer little more than palliative care and ineffective pharmaceuticals to those suffering from Alzheimer’s as the number of people afflicted continues to grow at an alarming rate. While there is no known cure for Alzheimer’s disease once it has begun its progression toward darkness, new research is beginning to shine a light on a super nutrient that could help compliment a healthy lifestyle toward prevention.

High Homocysteine Linked to Alzheimer’s Disease

Homocysteine From Meat and Protein Increases Risk of Alzheimer's

Homocysteine From Meat and Protein Increases Risk of Alzheimer's

Homocysteine is a naturally occurring amino acid commonly seen in excess due to a diet high in meat and protein sources. High blood levels are known to be a risk factor for heart disease as the amino acid damages the delicate inner lining of the coronary arteries. Research published in the New England Journal of Medicine demonstrated that elevated homocysteine levels double the risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) and B12 dramatically lower levels of homocysteine in the blood as they help to convert excess amounts of the amino acid for excretion.

Vitamin B12 Deficiency Linked with Alzheimer’s Disease

Evidence is mounting to suggest that a vitamin B12 deficiency may be connected to increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease. The results of a study released in the journal Neurology studied the level of homocysteine and vitamin B12 in elderly subjects. They found that for every single unit increase in the blood level of homocysteine, the risk of Alzheimer’s disease jumped by 16%. Similarly, risk decreased by 2% for each unit increase in blood concentration of Vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 is known to become dangerously low with age, and represents a significant factor in the development of Alzheimer’s disease that requires more research.

Brain Shrinkage Cut in Half with B Vitamins

B Vitamns Shown to Decrease Brain Shrinkage in Aging Adults

B Vitamins Shown to Decrease Brain Shrinkage in Aging Adults

The normal shrinking of the brain with age has been viewed as normal, but scientists have been able to show that shrinkage can be halted and reduced with high doses of B vitamins. While smaller brain size is not directly linked with dementia, it does represent a major risk factor for progression to Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers at Oxford University supplemented test participants with full spectrum B vitamins for a period of 2 years and found that they were able to reduce brain shrinkage in half as compared to a group receiving a placebo. The study authors conclude, “It is our hope that this simple and safe treatment will delay development of Alzheimer’s in many people who suffer from mild memory problems.”

Lowering the Risk of Developing Alzheimer’s Disease with Diet

More than enough evidence is mounting to show that poor diet and lack of B vitamins represent independent risk factors for developing Alzheimer’s disease that are within our control. Additional research has pointed to abnormal glycation of proteins and fats as a trigger for the deadly disease. Some have even gone so far as to call the condition Type III diabetes as high blood sugar and insulin resistance wreak damage on the electrical signaling circuits of the brain. You can lower your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease by eating a diet low in animal protein to restrict production of homocysteine. Eliminate sugar and refined carbohydrates that raise blood sugar and lead to insulin dysfunction.

From the research presented, it’s clear that supplementing with B vitamins in excess of the recommended daily allowance is essential. While the entire family of B vitamins can promote brain health, most studies concentrate on B6 and B12 taken in quantities that are 300 to 500% higher than the RDA values. Lower your risks of Alzheimer’s by taking the necessary dietary and supplemental steps and avoid joining the growing ranks that continue to spiral out of control.

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B Vitamins Help Lower Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

October 20, 2010

(Article first published as Can B Vitamins Help to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease? on Technorati.)

Alzheimer’s disease robs a person of their memories, thoughts and individuality. When surveyed, people indicate that of all diseases, this form of dementia is the most dreaded and misunderstood. Medical science can offer little more than palliative care and ineffective pharmaceuticals to those suffering from Alzheimer’s as the number of people afflicted continues to grow at an alarming rate. While there is no known cure for Alzheimer’s disease once it has begun its progression toward darkness, new research is beginning to shine a light on a super nutrient that could help compliment a healthy lifestyle toward prevention.

High Homocysteine Linked to Alzheimer’s Disease

Homocysteine is a naturally occurring amino acid commonly seen in excess due to a diet high in meat and protein sources. High blood levels are known to be a risk factor for heart disease as the amino acid damages the delicate inner lining of the coronary arteries. Research published in the New England Journal of Medicine demonstrated that elevated homocysteine levels double the risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) and B12 dramatically lower levels of homocysteine in the blood as they help to convert excess amounts of the amino acid for excretion.

Vitamin B12 Deficiency Linked with Alzheimer’s Disease
Evidence is mounting to suggest that a vitamin B12 deficiency may be connected to increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease. The results of a study released in the journal Neurology studied the level of homocysteine and vitamin B12 in elderly subjects. They found that for every single unit increase in the blood level of homocysteine, the risk of Alzheimer’s disease jumped by 16%. Similarly, risk decreased by 2% for each unit increase in blood concentration of Vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 is known to become dangerously low with age, and represents a significant factor in the development of Alzheimer’s disease that requires more research.
Brain Shrinkage Cut in Half with B Vitamins

The normal shrinking of the brain with age has been viewed as normal, but scientists have been able to show that shrinkage can be halted and reduced with high doses of B vitamins. While smaller brain size is not directly linked with dementia, it does represent a major risk factor for progression to Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers at Oxford University supplemented test participants with full spectrum B vitamins for a period of 2 years and found that they were able to reduce brain shrinkage in half as compared to a group receiving a placebo. The study authors conclude, “It is our hope that this simple and safe treatment will delay development of Alzheimer’s in many people who suffer from mild memory problems.”

Lowering the Risk of Developing Alzheimer’s Disease with Diet
More than enough evidence is mounting to show that poor diet and lack of B vitamins represent independent risk factors for developing Alzheimer’s disease that are within our control. Additional research has pointed to abnormal glycation of proteins and fats as a trigger for the deadly disease. Some have even gone so far as to call the condition Type III diabetes as high blood sugar and insulin resistance wreak damage on the electrical signaling circuits of the brain. You can lower your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease by eating a diet low in animal protein to restrict production of homocysteine. Eliminate sugar and refined carbohydrates that raise blood sugar and lead to insulin dysfunction.
From the research presented, it’s clear that supplementing with B vitamins in excess of the recommended daily allowance is essential. While the entire family of B vitamins can promote brain health, most studies concentrate on B6 and B12 taken in quantities that are 300 to 500% higher than the RDA values. Lower your risks of Alzheimer’s by taking the necessary dietary and supplemental steps and avoid joining the growing ranks that continue to spiral out of control.
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Eliminate Sugar to Drive Weight Loss

October 19, 2010

(Article first published as Study Shows Source of Calories Important to Weight Loss Efforts on Technorati.)

Calorie Source Critical to Weight Loss Efforts

Calorie Source Critical to Weight Loss Efforts

Is it true that a calorie is just a calorie, regardless of whether it comes from a fat, protein or carbohydrate source? A basic physics class will demonstrate that in a laboratory setting, all calories require the same amount of energy to burn regardless of type.

Our body uses a highly evolved energy management system that takes cues from the total number of calories consumed, as well as the calorie source to adjust our metabolic rate and determine fat storage patterns. A successful weight loss plan must include the right balance of nutrients to ensure weight loss success.

All Calories Are Not Created Equal

Our body regulates our genes based on the food we eat. Long standing research has shown that the quantity of foods we consume influences special genes that regulate longevity and the onset of disease. In the same fashion, the type of food we eat affects our metabolism and the effectiveness of insulin to control blood sugar. A diet high in refined carbohydrates that quickly convert to glucose results in insulin resistance and a host of metabolically mediated diseases.

Excess Carb Calories Stored as Fat

Sugar Calories Found to Triple Fat Storage

Sugar Calories Found to Triple Fat Storage

In his book Living Low Carb, nutritionist Dr. Jonny Bowden explains the results of a Swedish study where volunteers were given 20 extra calories from candy or peanuts each day for each half pound of body weight. That amounts to an extra 18,200 calories for a 150 pound individual over the course of 2 weeks or slightly over 5 pounds of additional weight from a simple calorie conversion. The group eating high protein peanuts gained a slight amount of weight, but the candy eating subjects packed on 3 times as much weight from the extra sugar calories.

Simple Carbs Raise Blood Sugar, Fuel Fat Storage

Calories from processed carbohydrate foods including candy, bread, pasta and baked goods cause blood sugar levels to surge after every meal. Eventually this leads to insulin resistance as glucose is not efficiently used for energy and remains in the blood. The body responds by converting the sugar into triglycerides or blood fats which are then easily stored in your fat cells.

Eating Protein Increases Base Metabolism

Protein Increases Base Metabolic Rate

Protein Increases Base Metabolic Rate

Protein has a much different effect on metabolism than simple carbohydrates. Proteins such as lean meats, nuts, seeds and whey do not stimulate blood sugar and help to maintain ideal insulin levels. Protein calories are converted to energy as long as total calories from all sources are not extreme. The body is much less likely store calories as fat since triglycerides are not formed in excess and insulin remains effective in managing blood sugar levels. Studies have shown that protein consumption increases metabolic rate at rest which burns more calories throughout the day.

Successful weight loss remains out of reach for the vast number of people who begin the journey. Many more people would be able to achieve their goal by eliminating refined carbohydrates and substituting healthy protein choices in addition to calorie restriction. By working to control blood sugar levels, you’ll improve your health and ensure your weight loss success.