Archive for the ‘Leptin’ Category

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Harness Leptin and Ghrelin to Assist Weight Loss

October 22, 2010

(Article first published as Control Leptin and Ghrelin to Achieve Natural Weight Loss on Technorati.)

Appetite Hormones Influence Weight Los Efforts

Appetite Hormones Influence Weight Loss Efforts

Our body has evolved to use a very efficient pair of hormones which signal the brain when it`s time to eat, or when we’ve had enough food. Leptin and ghrelin are the hormonal messengers responsible for our desire to eat, our craving for certain foods and whether we store excess calories as body fat or use it for energy. To prevent these hormones from becoming resistant and ineffective communicators, we need to follow a natural diet and lifestyle as our evolution prescribes.

Appetite Hormones Control Weight Regain After Dieting

Leptin and Ghrelin Affect Weight Regain After Dieting

Leptin and Ghrelin Affect Weight Regain After Dieting

The vast majority of children and adults alike eat and live in a manner which is much different than our Paleolithic ancestors. The large number of calories we consume from processed food sources causes metabolic disruption and impacts fat metabolism before and after weight loss. The results of a study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism shows the importance of leptin and ghrelin in the risk for weight regain in people who lose weight by dieting. Specifically, the study demonstrated that hormonal imbalance and leptin resistance were significant factors leading to weight regain.

Controlling Leptin and Ghrelin with Natural Diet and Lifestyle

After years of dietary abuse and poor lifestyle habits, our appetite hormones become resistant to the effects of excess food, and fail to properly transmit signals to the brain. While researchers are still working to unravel the precise mechanism behind leptin and ghrelin, they do know that supplementing in pill form has no effect on weight loss or blood levels of the hormones. You can master your appetite hormones by following a diet rich in foods found in their natural form and observing proper meal timing.

Stop Eating 3 Hours before Bed

Never Eat in Bed to Prevent Weight Gain

Never Eat in Bed to Prevent Weight Gain

Finish your last meal at least 3 hours before retiring for the night to allow digestion to complete. The body performs critical repair functions at night which can only occur on an empty stomach. Further, during the night hours your metabolism releases fat at the direction of your appetite hormones which only takes place when there are no readily available calories from a recent meal.

Eat 3 Properly Spaced Meals Each Day

Plan 3 well balanced meals a day and be sure to allow at least 5 to 6 hours in between. The timing between meals is important as it allow digestion to complete and blood sugar and lipid levels to return to normal. Avoid snacks of any type as this halts the release of stored fat and encourages weight gain.

Restrict Calories at Meals

Plan nutritionally balanced meals of 400 to 500 calories each, depending on your activity level. We haven`t evolved to properly digest large amounts of food at a single sitting, and this leads to malfunction of our appetite signaling mechanism. Eat slowly and chew each bite for 30 seconds to allow leptin to send the satiety signal to your brain.

Eliminate Sugar and Processed Carbohydrates

Refined carbohydrates and sugar laden foods wreak havoc on your blood sugar causing wild spikes which lead to metabolic dysfunction. Eventually this also disrupts the normal function of leptin and ghrelin as the hormones become less responsive to food intake. This is the beginning of the process which results in fat storage and obesity. Try eliminating all sugar and processed junk food for 2 weeks and find out how much better you`ll feel as you restore normal appetite control.

Leptin and ghrelin have evolved as a highly effective mechanism to keep us from starving to death in times of famine. Poor diet and lifestyle lead to the ultimate failure of this delicate signaling system, making weight loss an impossible task. Master your appetite hormones by following a naturally evolved diet and observe proper meal timing to reap the benefits of restored health and permanent weight loss.

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Appetite Hormones Assist Natural Weight Loss

October 22, 2010

(Article first published as Control Leptin and Ghrelin to Achieve Natural Weight Loss on Technorati.)

Our body has evolved to use a very efficient pair of hormones which signal the brain when it`s time to eat, or when we’ve had enough food. Leptin and ghrelin are the hormonal messengers responsible for our desire to eat, our craving for certain foods and whether we store excess calories as body fat or use it for energy. To prevent these hormones from becoming resistant and ineffective communicators, we need to follow a natural diet and lifestyle as our evolution prescribes.

Appetite Hormones Control Weight Regain After Dieting

The vast majority of children and adults alike eat and live in a manner which is much different than our Paleolithic ancestors. The large number of calories we consume from processed food sources causes metabolic disruption and impacts fat metabolism before and after weight loss. The results of a study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism shows the importance of leptin and ghrelin in the risk for weight regain in people who lose weight by dieting. Specifically, the study demonstrated that hormonal imbalance and leptin resistance were significant factors leading to weight regain.

Controlling Leptin and Ghrelin with Natural Diet and Lifestyle
After years of dietary abuse and poor lifestyle habits, our appetite hormones become resistant to the effects of excess food, and fail to properly transmit signals to the brain. While researchers are still working to unravel the precise mechanism behind leptin and ghrelin, they do know that supplementing in pill form has no effect on weight loss or blood levels of the hormones. You can master your appetite hormones by following a diet rich in foods found in their natural form and observing proper meal timing.
Stop Eating 3 Hours before Bed

Finish your last meal at least 3 hours before retiring for the night to allow digestion to complete. The body performs critical repair functions at night which can only occur on an empty stomach. Further, during the night hours your metabolism releases fat at the direction of your appetite hormones which only takes place when there are no readily available calories from a recent meal.

Eat 3 Properly Spaced Meals Each Day
Plan 3 well balanced meals a day and be sure to allow at least 5 to 6 hours in between. The timing between meals is important as it allow digestion to complete and blood sugar and lipid levels to return to normal. Avoid snacks of any type as this halts the release of stored fat and encourages weight gain.
Restrict Calories at Meals
Plan nutritionally balanced meals of 400 to 500 calories each, depending on your activity level. We haven`t evolved to properly digest large amounts of food at a single sitting, and this leads to malfunction of our appetite signaling mechanism. Eat slowly and chew each bite for 30 seconds to allow leptin to send the satiety signal to your brain.
Eliminate Sugar and Processed Carbohydrates
Refined carbohydrates and sugar laden foods wreak havoc on your blood sugar causing wild spikes which lead to metabolic dysfunction. Eventually this also disrupts the normal function of leptin and ghrelin as the hormones become less responsive to food intake. This is the beginning of the process which results in fat storage and obesity. Try eliminating all sugar and processed junk food for 2 weeks and find out how much better you`ll feel as you restore normal appetite control.
Leptin and ghrelin have evolved as a highly effective mechanism to keep us from starving to death in times of famine. Poor diet and lifestyle lead to the ultimate failure of this delicate signaling system, making weight loss an impossible task. Master your appetite hormones by following a naturally evolved diet and observe proper meal timing to reap the benefits of restored health and permanent weight loss.
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Sleep Burns More Fat, Assists Weight Loss

October 9, 2010

(Article first published as Good Night’s Sleep Essential to Weight Loss Efforts on Technorati.)

Adequate Sleep Encourages Fat Burn and Weight Loss

Adequate Sleep Encourages Fat Burn and Weight Loss

The importance of a good night’s sleep on overall health and weight loss efforts cannot be underestimated. Humans have evolved over countless generations to sleep at least 8 hours each day as our body requires a daily rhythmic cycle involving sleep to perform many essential repair and maintenance functions. When this rhythm is disturbed by eating late at night or when we don’t sleep enough, hormonal balance is disturbed and fat is stored rather than burned during the nighttime hours.

Sleep More to Burn More Fat

Sleep Deprivation Leads to Appetite Hormone Dysfunction

Sleep Deprivation Leads to Appetite Hormone Dysfunction

The results of a study performed by the University of Chicago Medical Center and published in the Annals of Internal Medicine demonstrates that a sound sleep of 7 to 8 hours helps to burn twice as much fat compared with 5 to 6 hours of sleep. The study participants were on a reduced calorie diet with a goal of losing weight by reducing body fat.

In the normal sleep group, 55% of the weight loss was found to be body fat while only a quarter of the weight lost in the deprived sleep subjects was due to fat loss. In addition to a reduced calorie diet and regular exercise, you can compliment your weight loss efforts by making essential lifestyle changes that work in concert with your body’s natural rhythms.

Sleep Controls Your Appetite Hormones

Leptin and ghrelin are the hormones your body uses to switch the hunger sensation on or off. Ghrelin is secreted in the digestive tract to signal hunger, and leptin is produced in your fat cells and alerts the brain that you’ve had enough to eat. Insufficient sleep lowers levels of leptin so you don’t feel satisfied after eating and are much more apt to overeat. Poor sleep also raises ghrelin secretion, making you feel hungry upon waking.

Inadequate sleep also causes leptin resistance, where the hormone is present but not effectively read by the brain and eating becomes uncontrolled. Leptin resistant people have been shown to increase their desire for calorie-laden, high carbohydrate foods by 45%. Studies confirm that 7 to 9 hours of sleep are required to keep our hunger hormones properly balanced and functional.

Stop Eating 3 Hours Before Sleep

Stop Eating 3 Hours Before Bedtime to Boost Fat Metabolism

Stop Eating 3 Hours Before Bedtime to Boost Fat Metabolism

We require about 3 hours to complete the initial stages of digestion after eating. During this time, our body expends a considerable amount of energy processing our food and extracting the nutrients and calories we need to live. The body is in a state of burning calories for energy and storing the excess for future use. We want our body to release fat to fuel our metabolic engine as we sleep, and this natural process is disrupted when eating too close to bedtime. Fat is stored instead of being burned as a result and weight loss efforts are diminished.

We normally take sleep for granted and don’t think to consider how improper sleep patterns can affect our health and weight loss efforts. Restful sleep influences our appetite signaling hormones and has been shown to burn more stored fat during the overnight hours. In addition to a low calorie diet with healthy physical activity, a good night’s sleep should be a priority to drive your weight loss efforts.

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Sleep Linked to Weight Loss Efforts

October 9, 2010

(Article first published as Good Night’s Sleep Essential to Weight Loss Efforts on Technorati.)

The importance of a good night’s sleep on overall health and weight loss efforts cannot be underestimated. Humans have evolved over countless generations to sleep at least 8 hours each day as our body requires a daily rhythmic cycle involving sleep to perform many essential repair and maintenance functions. When this rhythm is disturbed by eating late at night or when we don’t sleep enough, hormonal balance is disturbed and fat is stored rather than burned during the nighttime hours.

Sleep More to Burn More Fat

The results of a study performed by the University of Chicago Medical Center and published in the Annals of Internal Medicine demonstrates that a sound sleep of 7 to 8 hours helps to burn twice as much fat compared with 5 to 6 hours of sleep. The study participants were on a reduced calorie diet with a goal of losing weight by reducing body fat.

In the normal sleep group, 55% of the weight loss was found to be body fat while only a quarter of the weight lost in the deprived sleep subjects was due to fat loss. In addition to a reduced calorie diet and regular exercise, you can compliment your weight loss efforts by making essential lifestyle changes that work in concert with your body’s natural rhythms.
Sleep Controls Your Appetite Hormones

Leptin and ghrelin are the hormones your body uses to switch the hunger sensation on or off. Ghrelin is secreted in the digestive tract to signal hunger, and leptin is produced in your fat cells and alerts the brain that you’ve had enough to eat. Insufficient sleep lowers levels of leptin so you don’t feel satisfied after eating and are much more apt to overeat. Poor sleep also raises ghrelin secretion, making you feel hungry upon waking.

Inadequate sleep also causes leptin resistance, where the hormone is present but not effectively read by the brain and eating becomes uncontrolled. Leptin resistant people have been shown to increase their desire for calorie-laden, high carbohydrate foods by 45%. Studies confirm that 7 to 9 hours of sleep are required to keep our hunger hormones properly balanced and functional.
Stop Eating 3 Hours Before Sleep
We require about 3 hours to complete the initial stages of digestion after eating. During this time, our body expends a considerable amount of energy processing our food and extracting the nutrients and calories we need to live. The body is in a state of burning calories for energy and storing the excess for future use. We want our body to release fat to fuel our metabolic engine as we sleep, and this natural process is disrupted when eating too close to bedtime. Fat is stored instead of being burned as a result and weight loss efforts are diminished.
We normally take sleep for granted and don’t think to consider how improper sleep patterns can affect our health and weight loss efforts. Restful sleep influences our appetite signaling hormones and has been shown to burn more stored fat during the overnight hours. In addition to a low calorie diet with healthy physical activity, a good night’s sleep should be a priority to drive your weight loss efforts.
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Sleep Essential to Weight Loss

September 13, 2010

(Article first published as Sleep May be the Key to Successful Weight Loss on Technorati.)

Proper Sleep Linked with Weight Loss

Proper Sleep Linked with Weight Loss

Amazing as it may sound, sleep may be the missing link to achieving your weight loss goal. The importance of a good night’s sleep is discounted by many people, yet the impact on overall health and body weight cannot be underestimated. The body performs many critical functions while we sleep that assist our immune response, guide cellular restructuring as well as fat metabolism and weight loss maintenance.

Sleep Essential to Burn Fat

Insufficient sleep causes a disruption of the appetite hormones leptin and ghrelin which direct fat metabolism. When these hormones become resistant to cues from the brain due to dietary abuse or lack of deep sleep, fat is not released efficiently and remains stored as excess weight in the body.

The results of a study published in the journal Sleep, reveal that teenagers who received less than 8 hours of sleep per night consumed 2.2% more dietary fat on average. Since fat is densely packed with calories, this leads to weight gain over time.

Young Children at Risk for Obesity with Insufficient Sleep

Poor Sleep Leads to Future Weight Problems in the Young

Poor Sleep Leads to Future Weight Problems in the Young

Young children require even more sleep than teens and adults, and may be increasing their risk for weight problems and obesity in later life when they average less than 10 hours a night. This is according to a study published in the American Journal of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine which studied adolescents who received fewer than 10 hours of sleep each night, and found they were more than twice as likely to be overweight five years later, with some becoming obese as well.

Poor Sleep Disrupts Appetite Hormones in Adults

Insufficient or disrupted sleep causes levels of the critical appetite hormones, leptin and ghrelin to fluctuate leading to increased hunger. Normally, leptin signals the brain when you’ve had enough and it’s time to stop eating. Conversely, ghrelin sends the cue that you’re hungry and ready to eat. In studies where sleep was deprived and subjects received less than 7 hours per night, leptin levels dropped and ghrelin rose, resulting in the urge to overeat.

There was a direct correlation between the number of hours slept and the desire to eat too much. Those who were most sleep deprived had an overwhelming desire to eat, and didn’t know when to stop. More importantly, these participants desired high carbohydrate, calorie rich foods nearly twice as much as those who slept at least 8 hours. Lack of sleep causes metabolic disruption affecting how body fat is stored and influences our hormones causing us to overeat.

Plan 7 to 9 Hours of Sleep Every Night

Avoid Sugar and Sleep 7 to 9 Hours Daily

Avoid Sugar and Sleep 7 to 9 Hours Daily

The best way to avoid weight gain from sleep deprivation is to plan a minimum of 7 hours and no more than 9 hours of sleep each night. Extensive research concludes that this is the proper zone to ensure optimal health and avoid weight gain from hormonal imbalance. Additionally, you can help by making a conscious effort to limit or eliminate refined carbohydrates and sugar from your diet. This will become easier to do as you normalize your sleep patterns since your desire for excessive carbohydrates will subside.

We have evolved to sleep one-third of our lives, a critical process that has served us well for generations. The body performs many essential repair functions while we sleep which lead to improved immune function and a disease free life. By ensuring the proper hours of sleep every night, you’ll feel energized during the day as you attain and maintain your naturally healthy weight.

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Sleep Essential to Permanent Weight Loss

September 13, 2010

(Article first published as Sleep May be the Key to Successful Weight Loss on Technorati.)

Amazing as it may sound, sleep may be the missing link to achieving your weight loss goal. The importance of a good night’s sleep is discounted by many people, yet the impact on overall health and body weight cannot be underestimated. The body performs many critical functions while we sleep that assist our immune response, guide cellular restructuring as well as fat metabolism and weight loss maintenance.

Sleep Essential to Burn Fat
Insufficient sleep causes a disruption of the appetite hormones leptin and ghrelin which direct fat metabolism. When these hormones become resistant to cues from the brain due to dietary abuse or lack of deep sleep, fat is not released efficiently and remains stored as excess weight in the body.
The results of a study published in the journal Sleep, reveal that teenagers who received less than 8 hours of sleep per night consumed 2.2% more dietary fat on average. Since fat is densely packed with calories, this leads to weight gain over time.
Young Children at Risk for Obesity with Insufficient Sleep
Young children require even more sleep than teens and adults, and may be increasing their risk for weight problems and obesity in later life when they average less than 10 hours a night. This is according to a study published in the American Journal of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine which studied adolescents who received fewer than 10 hours of sleep each night, and found they were more than twice as likely to be overweight five years later, with some becoming obese as well.

Poor Sleep Disrupts Appetite Hormones in Adults
Insufficient or disrupted sleep causes levels of the critical appetite hormones, leptin and ghrelin to fluctuate leading to increased hunger. Normally, leptin signals the brain when you’ve had enough and it’s time to stop eating. Conversely, ghrelin sends the cue that you’re hungry and ready to eat. In studies where sleep was deprived and subjects received less than 7 hours per night, leptin levels dropped and ghrelin rose, resulting in the urge to overeat.
There was a direct correlation between the number of hours slept and the desire to eat too much. Those who were most sleep deprived had an overwhelming desire to eat, and didn’t know when to stop. More importantly, these participants desired high carbohydrate, calorie rich foods nearly twice as much as those who slept at least 8 hours. Lack of sleep causes metabolic disruption affecting how body fat is stored and influences our hormones causing us to overeat.
Plan 7 to 9 Hours of Sleep Every Night

The best way to avoid weight gain from sleep deprivation is to plan a minimum of 7 hours and no more than 9 hours of sleep each night. Extensive research concludes that this is the proper zone to ensure optimal health and avoid weight gain from hormonal imbalance. Additionally, you can help by making a conscious effort to limit or eliminate refined carbohydrates and sugar from your diet. This will become easier to do as you normalize your sleep patterns since your desire for excessive carbohydrates will subside.

We have evolved to sleep one-third of our lives, a critical process that has served us well for generations. The body performs many essential repair functions while we sleep which lead to improved immune function and a disease free life. By ensuring the proper hours of sleep every night, you’ll feel energized during the day as you attain and maintain your naturally healthy weight.
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Controlling Leptin and Ghrelin Essential to Permanent Weight Loss

September 10, 2010
(Article first published as Controlling Lifestyle and Hormones is Key to Successful Weight Loss on Technorati.)

The human body is very complex, having evolved over generations to respond to signals delivered from our environment, lifestyle and diet. We have developed a finely tuned hormonal balance system which regulates many critical functions throughout our body, including how we store or burn body fat for energy. The food we eat and our particular life habits have a significant effect on our ability to lose weight and keep it off permanently.

Appetite Hormones in Control of Fat Metabolism

The appetite controlling hormones, leptin and ghrelin provide a powerful signal to the brain which determines whether calories and fat are converted to triglycerides for storage or used as a source of energy. The two hormones are tightly connected as they continually communicate based on our food choices, meal timing and degree of insulin resistance.

Leptin and Ghrelin Affect Weight Regain
The results of a study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism show that the levels of leptin and ghrelin before beginning a new diet may predetermine your ability to sustain weight loss. Specifically, increased levels of leptin and lower concentrations of ghrelin before dieting correlated with weight loss which could not be maintained by study participants.

Making Changes That Affect Permanent Weight Loss
Since leptin and ghrelin were discovered by researchers over the last 10 to 20 years, so much remains to be learned about these potent appetite and fat metabolizing hormones. While research continues at breakneck speed to understand how the pair functions at the cellular level, scientists learned early on that popping a leptin or ghrelin pill had no effect on weight loss or altering concentrations of the hormones in the blood. The only way to make these hormones work in your favor is to make the following dietary and lifestyle changes.

Lifestyle Change 1: No Food after 7 PM
Food digestion requires large amounts of energy and resources from your body. When you eat late at night, this process takes precedence over other important maintenance functions which normally occur overnight. Further, your body burns fat as you sleep, which is hampered when you go to bed with a full stomach.

Lifestyle Change 2: Eat 5 Small Meals Every Day

We have evolved as hunter-gatherers at a time when food was scarce and small meals were eaten as they were available. Today we tend to eat 3 large meals each day which overloads our cellular capacity to effectively process and utilize the excess calories. Target 5 smaller meals of 300 to 400 calories each depending on your activity level with no between meal snacking. Each meal should be nutritionally balanced including choices from all food groups.

Lifestyle Change 3: Eat Breakfast with a High Quality Protein Source
You’ve heard it before – start your morning every day with breakfast. This is good advice, as food stimulates your metabolism and increases your calorie consumption for the remainder of the day. Even more important, include a good protein source such as chicken, turkey, nuts, seeds, whey, or peanut butter. Avoid traditional breakfast cereals, breads and processed breakfast foods as these will break down quickly leaving you more apt to snack.

Lifestyle Change 4: No Sugar or Refined Carbs
Refined junk food carbs and sugar destroy your metabolism, as blood sugar and insulin levels rise and fall rapidly which also affects your appetite hormones. Carbohydrates from vegetable and other natural sources have the opposite effect as the high fiber content prevents metabolic disaster. Refined carbs also tempt you to snack between meals which is a sure fire method to pack on the pounds.

We are creatures of habit, and many will find it difficult to make even the smallest changes to their diet or the timing of meals. We’re driven by a genetic engine which is programmed to function optimally on a naturally low sugar and carbohydrate diet eaten at staggered intervals. While our body does adapt and allow for some variability, our permanent weight loss goals can only be met by controlling our appetite hormones, leptin and ghrelin.