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Drinking Sweetened Beverages Boosts Risk of Diabetes 26%

November 1, 2010

(Article first published as Soda and Sweetened Drinks Increase Risk of Diabetes on Technorati.)

Sweetened Drinks Increase Risk of Developing Diabetes

Sweetened Drinks Increase Risk of Developing Diabetes

The incidence of Type II diabetes has been steadily increasing over the past half century. Projections are that the number of new cases will triple by 2050, afflicting 1 in 3 men, women and children. Many people are unaware they have the disease as there are no outward symptoms in the early stages of the disease.

Few realize that having diabetes increases the risk of developing heart disease and sudden death from a heart attack twofold. Research has now linked liquid sugar in the form of soda and sweetened beverages directly to the skyrocketing incidence of new cases of the deadly disease. Taking the proper steps today can dramatically lower your risk of becoming diabetic and allow you to avoid the many dangerous complications.

Study Confirms Link Between Soda and Risk of Diabetes

The typical 12 ounce serving of most sweetened soft drinks is equivalent to eating 12 teaspoons of sugar. Few people would ever use that much if they were to sweeten a beverage themselves, yet they subject themselves to several servings every day. The results of a study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health and published in the journal Diabetes Care demonstrates that soda and other sweetened beverages are ‘clearly and consistently associated with greater risk of metabolic syndrome and Type II diabetes’. Two sugary drinks per day increase risk of diabetes by 26% and metabolic syndrome by 20%.

Sugar in Soda Linked to Weight Gain

Excess Sugar From Soda Leads to Weight Gain

Excess Sugar From Soda Leads to Weight Gain

Empty sugar calories in sweetened beverages are linked to weight gain and play a significant role in the rapid rise in obesity. The key sweetener in most soda is high fructose corn syrup that is known to promote obesity because of the way it’s metabolized by the liver.

Calories from this source aren’t registered as a source of energy since they bypass processing in the liver and are passed straight through to the blood where they cause blood sugar levels to spike. The excess sugar is converted to triglycerides and neatly packed away as body fat. Eventually this process causes metabolic instability, high blood pressure, insulin resistance and diabetes.

Break the Sugar Cycle with Natural Diet and Fresh Brewed Tea

Fresh Brewed Tea is a Great Alternative to Soda

Fresh Brewed Tea is a Great Alternative to Soda

The best news from this study is that you can have a significant impact on your risk of developing diabetes by making small changes to your diet and lifestyle. The first step is to cut all sweetened beverages. This will lower your daily calories significantly and begin the slow process of metabolic recovery as your body works to regain control over blood sugar levels and improve insulin response. Include at least 4 cups of fresh brewed tea each day and sweeten with all natural stevia extract as needed.

A natural compliment to removing sugary drinks from your diet is to lower your total glycemic load by slowly cutting processed foods that contain high fructose corn syrup or excessive amounts of sugar. Remember that refined carbohydrates such as breads, pasta, rice and potatoes have the same effect as eating sugar because they are rapidly converted to glucose through digestion. Replace these foods with healthy alternatives including fresh raw vegetables, nuts, seeds, and minimally cooked meats. These foods break down slowly and don’t cause wild blood sugar surges that lead to diabetes.

Everyone needs to be aware of the need to cut sugar from their diet. Soda has been identified as a prime food source that contributes to diabetes, and health conscious individuals will remove all sources of sugar from their diet to dramatically lower the risk of diabetes and extend their natural lifespan.

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