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Magnesium Deficiency Linked to Sudden Cardiac Death

October 27, 2010

(Article first published as Magnesium Slashes Heart Attack Risk, Helps Prevent Diabetes on Technorati.)

Magnesium is Essential to Heart Health and Diabetes Prevention

Magnesium is Essential to Heart Health and Diabetes Prevention

Magnesium is one of the most common elemental minerals in the human body yet experts believe that more than 90% of adults are deficient, placing them at extreme risk of sudden death from a heart attack and developing diabetes. Hundreds of biochemical functions that drive energy metabolism and DNA repair are fueled by magnesium.

We rely on eating vegetables and other natural foods grown in magnesium rich soils as our source of this vital mineral. Most people don’t eat enough fresh vegetables to supply adequate magnesium while poor farming practices have depleted the mineral from most commercially grown crops. You can ensure that you receive magnesium though diet and supplementation to stave off heart disease and metabolic dysfunction.

Magnesium Deficiency Linked with Diabetes

Magnesium is used by hundreds of enzymes in our body to regulate blood sugar metabolism. The mineral is known to dampen the flames of inflammation that interferes with healthy blood sugar and can lead to insulin resistance. The results of a study published in the journal Biologic Trace Elements Research shows that as magnesium levels in the blood increase, the risk of Type II diabetes declines in a corresponding fashion. By boosting levels of fat storage hormones such as adiponectin, magnesium plays a critical role in protecting metabolic function and lowering risk of diabetes.

Magnesium Protects Against Sudden Cardiac Death

Magnesium Cuts Risk of Sudden Death by 40%

Magnesium Cuts Risk of Sudden Death by 40%

Sudden cardiac death is a leading cause of heart-related deaths among those 40 and older. More than 250,000 people die each year for this preventable condition. Research that was part of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study demonstrates that those individuals with the highest magnesium in blood circulation had a 40% lower risk of dying from a heart attack as those with the lowest levels.

Magnesium is necessary to relax blood vessels and arteries while maintaining normal blood pressure. Further research has demonstrated the effect of magnesium on dangerous plaque formation. Low levels of magnesium are associated with the development of foamy plaque on the inner lining of the coronary arteries as well as thickening of the artery walls. High levels of magnesium were shown to decrease arterial wall thickness by 42%.

Magnesium from Diet or Supplements

Soils are Nutrient Deficient Due to Overfarming Practices

Soils are Nutrient Deficient Due to Over Farming Practices

The typical diet of refined foods does not supply sufficient amounts of magnesium to counteract disease. Manufacturers process out most of the nutrients necessary for health and are a poor choice to optimize health. Good sources of magnesium are nuts, seeds and beans in their natural state as well as organically grown vegetables and leafy greens. Most people will need to supplements to reach the daily intake of 400 mg recommended by experts.

Magnesium levels are grossly deficient due to mineral depletion from soils and a diet of synthetically produced foods. It`s no coincidence that humans have evolved to be reliant on a natural mineral to prevent heart disease and metabolic dysfunction. Magnesium has been plentiful in our food for generations and must be consumed as part of a natural diet or through supplementation to ensure optimal health.

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